vintage hair GET LISTED TODAY! http://www.HairnewsNetwork.com  Hair News Network. All Hair. All The time.Parisienne Chic.

You  see  it  everywhere.  The  media,  in  particular,  relishes  in  it.  Books,  movies,  advertisements,  songs,  heck,  even  Barbie  dolls  have  been  inspired  by  it.  The  “it”  girl  of  all  “it”  girls:  The  myth  of  the  Parisienne. But  is  it  truly  just  a  myth,  or  has  it  become  such  a  grand  cultural  phenomenon  that  it  has  transformed  into  a  reality  within  the  modern  society  we  live  in?  Furthermore,  how  far  have  women  gone  to  transform  this  myth  into  their  own  living,  breathing  reality?  Is  it  really  worth  all  the  hype?  Or  is  it  all  in  the  group’s  selective  subconscious?

The  eternal  Parisienne  stems  from  the  late  19th-century,  historically  known  as  “La  Belle  Epoque”.  According  to  the  web  blogger,  Alison  Perrin,  the  eternal  Parisienne  is  essentially  a  myth,  and  “since  its  inception,  La  Parisienne  is  a  model  of  elegance  and  attitude.”  ( Perrin, Alison. “The Eternal Parisienne.” N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Oct. 2014.)  Essentially,  the  myth  is  an  attitude  that  comes  straight  from  a  woman’s  subconscious.

The  media  then  targets  the  subconscious  through  pointing  out  women’s  insecurities  through  the  representation  of  a  “desirable”  woman,  so  to  speak.  For  example,  in  Sarah  Mower’s  article, “Caroline  de  Maigret”,  she  describes,  in  painstaking  detail,  a  quintessential  Parisienne,  Caroline  de  Maigret.  Through  vivid  descriptions  such  as,  “One: “Don’t  be  afraid  of  aging.” And  two: “Always  be  fuckable”—even  when  you’re  standing  in  line  to  buy  a  baguette”,  the  author  creates  an  aura  of  self-indulgent  charm  for  de  Maigret.  Consequently,  Vogue  magazine  then  reflects  off  the  je  ne  sais  quoi  aura  de  Maigret  has  effortlessly  shown  throughout  the  interview  by  employing  that  she  is  a  strong  woman:  an  author,  a  model,  a  Parisienne,  yet  she  is  also  a  loving  mother,  which  is  depicted  in  the  image  of  her  and  her  son  smiling  at  each  other.  The  viewer  may  notice  the  household  setting,  which  increases  the  relatability  of  the  subject  and  allows  for  middle-class  women  to  believe  that  they  can  be  like  her.  At  the  same  time,  if  the  viewer  reads  the  caption  underneath  the  picture,  it  says  that  de  Maigret  is  wearing  a  “Rag  &  Bone  t-shirt  and  Chanel  trousers”—  which  then  encapsulates  the  idea  that  this  woman  is  effortlessly  charming,  yet  at  the  same  time  is  somehow  untouchable  due  to  the  expensive  clothes  that  she  is  wearing.

Furthermore,  in  media  discourse,  the  term  “Cinderella  effect”  from  John  Berger’s  Ways  of  Seeing  comes  to  mind.  Caroline  de  Maigret  is  the  text— the  Parisienne.  She  is  inexplicably  charming,  which  allows  women  to  look  up  to  her  and  want  to  be  her.  This  is  where  the  myth  comes  in.  “La  Parisienne”  is  a  myth  that  women  and  also  men  somewhat  invest  in  their  psyches  due  to  ubiquitous  media  circulation.  Arguably,  the  myth  stems  from  La  Belle  Epoque  artists  Manet  and  Renoir,  where  both  men  paint  women  “to  the  rank  of  supreme  elegance”  (Perrin, Alison. “The Eternal Parisienne.” N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Oct. 2014.).

However,  this  “rank  of  supreme  elegance”  is  exploited  in  the  article,  “To  succeed  as  a  Parisienne,  just  lie,  dupe  and  deceive.”  Written  by  Anne-Elisabeth  Moutet  from  The  Telegraph,  the  journalist  attacks  the  Parisienne  myth  by  pointing  out  its  flaws.  For  instance,  Moutet  claims  that  the  skinny  and  chic  physique  that  Parisian  women  are  widely  known  for  stems  from  their  chronic  use  of  cigarettes,  which  then  suppresses  their  appetites  and  lowers  their  want  to  eat.  Another  vivid  example is  that  in  regards  to  cheating  in  relationships,  Parisian  women’s  number  one  rule  is  to  “DENY, DENY, DENY.  Don’t  feel  guilty.  This  is  about  you,  not  against  him. What’s  good  for  you  is  good  for your  relationship:  basically,  you’re  just  being  a  thoughtful  girlfriend.”  (Moutet, Anne-Elisabeth. “To Succeed as a Parisienne, Just Lie, Dupe and Deceive.” The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group, 14 Oct. 2014. Web. 22 Oct. 2014.)  The  author  then  points  out  that  this  effortless  charm  the  myth  employs  is  taken  into  extreme  and  can  be  seen  to  borderline  dishonesty  and  degrade  modern  relationship  ethics.

“La  Parisienne”  is  a  myth.  Being  a  Parisienne  is  a  state  of  mind,  an  attitude,  and  there  is  not  one  specific  person  that  embodies  every  description  of  this  myth.  Perhaps  Brigitte  Bardot  or  Ines  de  la  Fressange  can  arguably  embody  this  character;  however,  even  in  this  situation,  they  are  both  just  interpretations  of  the  myth, due  to  the  fact  that  they  are  not  the  same  person,  they  do  not  come  from  the  same  background,  and  each  woman  presents  a  different  aura  and  attitude—  which  then,  in  turn,  subjects  the  truth  to  the  reality  of  the  myth  itself.

LIFE magazine digitized its image archive. Photo recreation coming right up.

Advertisements