le-dome-paris

Paris,  post-WWI,  was  a  dream,   a  living  painting,  a  reverie,   both  for  modern  viewers  today  and  also  the  citizens  of  its  time.  Everyone  was  lost  out  of  their  minds,  completely  filled  with  their  own  egocentric  perspectives  of  the  world  and  each  day  was  a  living,  breathing  spectacle  of  a  party,  based  in  the  cultural  center  of  the  world:  Paris. Being  the  hearth  of culture  at  the  time,  Paris  was  inhabited  by  world-renowned  authors  such  as  Ernest  Hemingway  and   F.  Scott  Fitzgerald,  as  well  as  artists  such  as  Pablo  Picasso,  whose  Cubist  works  were  judged  most  dominantly  by  Gertrude  Stein.

ErnestHemingway pablo-picassodemoiselles_NewFINAL

Stein,  a  powerful  woman,  writer  and  modernist  art  collector  of  the  time,  claimed  that  the  Lost  Generation  in  a  phrase  while  conversing  with  Hemingway,  supposedly  quoting  a  garage  mechanic  saying  to  her,  “You  are  all  a  lost  generation.”  (“The  American  Novel”- Lost Generation)  Post- WWI  nostalgia  accumulated  within  the  Lost  Generation,  especially  with  their  constant  use  of  alcohol  and  drugs  (most  specifically  absinthe  and  opium).  “The  phrase  signifies  a  disillusioned  postwar  generation  characterized  by  lost  values,  lost  belief  in  the  idea  of  human  progress,  and  a  mood  of  futility  and  despair  leading  to  hedonism.”  (“The  American  Novel”-  Lost  Generation) The  loss  of  belief  in  something  greater  than  themselves  became  the  utter  downfall  of  the  partygoers  of  the  Lost  Generation.  With  the  Great  Depression  looming  around  the  corner,  their  own  mental  depression  became  so  disillusioned  to  the  point  that  their  nostalgia  for  La  Belle  Epoque, as  well  as  the  First  World  War,  had  been  submerged  and  hidden  underneath  the  alcohol  and  the  constant  use  of  drugs.

However,  with  depression  and  sadness  comes  the  romantic  side  of  the  Lost  Generation.  Because  of  the  malevolence  and  disgust  that  came  after  World  War  I,  everyone  in  the  world  just  wanted  to  forget  about  the  cesspool  of  negativity  and  unnecessary  death.  As  featured  in  Woody  Allen’s  film,  “Midnight  in  Paris”,   the  disillusioned  protagonist  Gil,  reflects  the  citizens  of  Paris  during  the  1920s.  In  Ernest  Hemingway’s  A  Moveable  Feast,  he  describes  a  young  person  that  has  lived  in  Paris :  “If  you  are  lucky  enough  to  have  lived  in  Paris  as a  young  man  then  wherever  you  go  for  the  rest  of  your  life,  it  stays  with  you,  for  Paris  is  a  moveable  feast.”  (“Decoding  Woody  Allen’s   Midnight  in  Paris”)  

However,  this  nostalgic  beauty  of  Paris  is  questionable  within  today’s  standards.  Paris,  a  moveable  feast,  a  living,  breathing  spectacle  of  a  party  during  the  1920s;  is  it  still  the  same  today?  Does  it  still  have  the  same  ambiance  and  aura  during  these  times?

In  my  opinion,  Parisian  economy  and  culture  is   on  a  slow  decline,  and  are  not  up  to  par  to  the  rest  of  the  world’s  modernity.  Quite  ironically,  the  once  center  of  the  world  has  become  a  tourist  trap,  and  though  the  economy  thrives  from  these  tourists,  we  as  cynical  viewers  must  not  forget  the  fact  that  governmental  corruption  has  somehow  tainted  the  Parisian  limelight.  Yes,  there  is  still  a  street  market  on  “Rue  Mouffetard,  and  the  smells  of  fresh  baked  bread,  cheese,  coffee,  crepes,  roasting  chicken,  etc.”  (“Walk  Like  the  Man:  An  Englishman  Trails  an  American  in  Paris”). Yes,  there  is  still  a  good  cafe  or  two  by  Place  Saint-Michel.  And  yes,  Les  Deux  Magots  is  still  standing.  However,  in  my  opinion,  these  are  only  establishments  that  are  haunted  by  the  memories  and  history  of  the  Lost  Generation,  and  nowadays,  visitors  try  to  breathe  in  the  ambiance  and  pretend  that  they  are  in  the  1920s,  smoking  a  cigarette  or  drinking  absinthe—  even  if,  outside,  there  is  a  Starbucks  on  every  block,  and  these  historical  establishments  are  overpriced  and  have  been  turned  into  tourist  traps.

The  Lost  Generation : Paris’  own  mob  of  great  and  disillusioned  intellectuals.  Will  the  world  see  another  string  of  artists  that  are  able  to  create,  mold,  and  inspire  the  next  generation  as  much  as  Hemingway,  Fitzgerald,  and  Stein  have?  We  may  just  have  to  wait  and  see.

Advertisements