If  Adele  and  Amy  Winehouse  had  a  lovechild,  it  would  be  the  Welsh  songstress  Duffy.

photo     +  umg-debuted-amy-winehouse-documentary-trailer-news-fdrmx-1024x5761  =  alg-music-duffy-jpg

Music  is  created  to  express  emotions,   to  become  a   different   person,  to  be  transported  into  a  different  time — even  for  just  a  couple  of  minutes.  It  is  an  elixir  and  an  escape  route  to  our  everyday  mundane  routines.   Duffy’s  2008  album  Rockferry  makes  me  feel  exactly  that,  as  if  I  am  transported  into  the  1960s,  wearing  a  red  and  white  polka  dot  dress  while  walking  into  a  psychedelic  room  filled  with  Sam  Cooke  posters  and  vinyl  records  of  The  Supremes.  

51xnrzl-2bll

Since  music  is  ephemeral,  artists  tend  to  bring  old  music  into  their  new  content  to  create  an  eternal  pastiche.  It  seems  that  in  Western  pop  culture,  the  concept  of  intertwining  past  music  greats  to  influence  our  modern  songs  is  an  evergoing  trend.  Duffy’s  Grammy  award-winning  album  Rockferry   is  an  example  of  this.  The  album  is  filled  with  dulcet  and  jaded  lyrics  mixed  with   bluesy  undertones,  beautifully  interwoven  with  nostalgic  blue  soul.  

My  personal  favorite,  “Warwick Avenue,”  is  the  perfect  representation  of  a  collection  of  multiple  genres.   At  19  years  old,  Duffy  was  familiarizing  herself  with  the  London  Underground  and  accidentally  found  herself  at  the  Warwick  Avenue  station;  she  then  wrote  the  song  the  following  day.  The  lyrics  When  I  get  to  Warwick  Avenue,  meet  me  by  the  entrance  of  the  Tube.  We  can  talk  things  over  a  little  time,  promise  me  you  won’t  step  outta  line  compliment  the  album’s  jaded  undertones.  

“Warwick  Avenue”  was  the  second  single  released  from  the  album,  following  the  debut  limited  edition  single  “Rockferry”  in  November  2007. It  was  then  followed  by  “Mercy”,  which  went  straight  to  number  one.   Moreover,  with  “Mercy,”  Duffy  became  the  First  Welsh  woman  to  achieve  number  one  on  the  UK  Singles  chart  since  1983.  

Rockferry  was  a  commercial  success,  reaching  number  one  in  multiple  music  markets  and  earning   Duffy  several  accolades.  The  album  became  the  best-selling  album  in  the  United  Kingdom  in  2008  with  1.68  million  copies  sold  and  was  certified  Platinum  several  times  by  the  RIAA.  It  sold  more  than  7  million  copies  and  was the  fourth  best  selling  album  of  2008  worldwide.

large_duffyaward  duffygrammysport_gallery_primary

 In  the  United  Kingdom,  Rockferry  was  in  the  top  five  for  a  full  year  after  its  release.  The  album  has  won  several  number  of  awards  since  then,  which  includes  the  Grammy  Award  for  the  Best  Pop  Vocal  Album  in  the  51st  Grammy  Awards.  Furthermore,  the  Welsh  songstress  won  three  awards  at  the  2009  BRIT  awards,  including  Best  British  Album,  British  breakthrough,  and  Best  British  Female.

Duffy’s  album,  Rockferry,  will  always  have  a  special  place  in  my  vinyl  shelf.  Her  nostalgia  for  the  blues  and  soul,  intertwined  with  her  mellifluous  lyrics  is  an understated  reflection  of  an  era  brought  back  to  life.

 

Advertisements